dissabte, 30 de maig de 2015

ANCOR TI PUÓ NEL MONDO RENDER FAMA CH'EL VIVE E LUNGA VITA ch’el vive, e lunga vita ancor aspetta se Innanzi tempo grazia a sé nol chiama

The Inferno: Canto XXXI, by Dante Alighieri

Canto XXXI: Summary:
The Central Pit of Malebolge, The Giants; Dante to the reader describes the scene, “Here it was less than night and less than day; my eyes could make out little through the gloom, but I heard the shrill note of a trumpet bray louder than any thunder. As if by force, it drew my eyes; I stared into the gloom along the path of the sound back to its source. After the bloody rout when Charlemagne had lost the band of Holy Knights, Roland blew no more terribly for all his pain.”

Virgil takes Dante by the hand, and says, “The better to prepare you for strange truth, let me explain those shapes you see ahead: they are not towers but giants. They stand in the well from the naval down; and stationed round its bank they mount guard on the final pit of Hell.”

Dante to the reader describes his feelings, “Just as a man in a fog that starts to clear begins little by little to piece together the shapes the vapor crowded from the air―so, when those shapes grew clearer as I drew across the darkness to the central brink, error fled from me; and my terror grew.”

Dante to the reader describes the scene, “For just as Montereggione the great towers crown the encircling wall; so the grim giants whom Jove still threatens when the thunder roars raised from the rim of stone about that well the upper halves of their bodies, which loomed up like turrets through the murky air of Hell.”

Dante to the reader describes the giants, “His face, it seemed to me, was quite as high and wide as the bronze pine cone in St. Peter’s with the rest of him proportioned accordingly: so that the bank, which made an apron for him from the waist down, still left so much exposed that three Frieslanders standing on the rim, one on another, could not have reached his hair; for to that point at which men’s capes are buckled, thirty good hand-spans of brute bulk rose clear.”

Canto XXXI: Analysis:
The Central Pit of Malebolge, The Giants; Dante to the reader regarding Virgil explains with an analogy, “One and the same tongue had first wounded me so that the blood came rushing to my cheeks, and then supplied the soothing remedy. Just so, as I have heard, the magic steel of the lance that was Achilles’ and his father’s could wound at a touch, and, at another, heal” (1-6).

“Achilles’ Lance” is a magic lance left to Achilles by Peleus, his father. In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, XIII, 171 ff., it describes Achilles’ lance. Sonneterrs of Dante’s time made frequent metaphoric use of this lance. For example, similar to the lance’s ability to cure and heal, so could the lady’s look destroy with love and with a kiss make whole.

Dante to the reader describes the scene, “Here it was less than night and less than day; my eyes could make out little through the gloom, but I heard the shrill note of a trumpet bray louder than any thunder. As if by force, it drew my eyes; I stared into the gloom along the path of the sound back to its source. After the bloody rout when Charlemagne had lost the band of Holy Knights, Roland blew no more terribly for all his pain” (10-18).

“Roland” was the nephew of Charlemagne (17). Roland was the hero of the French epic poem, the Chanson de Roland. Roland protected the rear of Charlemagne’s column on the return march through the Pyrenees from a war against the Saracens. When Roland was attacked he was too proud to blow his horn for help, but as he was dying he blew such a prodigious blast that he heard Charlemagne eight miles away. The “Holy Knights” are a sworn band of men at arms (17).

“As [Dante] stared through that obscurity, [he] saw what seemed a cluster of great towers” in the Central Pit of Malebolge (19-20). Whereat [Dante] cried: “[Virgil], what is this city?” (21) Virgil to Dante replied, “You are still too far back in the dark to make out clearly what you think you see; it is natural that you should miss the mark: You will see clearly when you reach that place how much your eyes mislead you at a distance; I urge you, therefore, to increase your pace” (22-27).

Virgil takes Dante by the hand, and says, “The better to prepare you for strange truth, let me explain those shapes you see ahead: they are not towers but giants. They stand in the well from the naval down; and stationed round its bank they mount guard on the final pit of Hell” (29-33).

Dante to the reader describes his feelings, “Just as a man in a fog that starts to clear begins little by little to piece together the shapes the vapor crowded from the air―so, when those shapes grew clearer as I drew across the darkness to the central brink, error fled from me; and my terror grew” (34-39).

Dante to the reader describes the scene, “For just as Montereggione the great towers crown the encircling wall; so the grim giants whom Jove still threatens when the thunder roars raised from the rim of stone about that well the upper halves of their bodies, which loomed up like turrets through the murky air of Hell” (40-45).

“Montereggione is a castle in Val d’Elsa near Siena. In 1213, Monterggione was built. The castles walls had a circumference of more than half a kilometer and were crowned by fourteen great towers, most of which are now destroyed.

Dante to the reader describes as he steps closer to the giants, “I had drawn close enough to one already to make out the great arms along his sides, the face, the shoulders, the breast, and most of the belly. Nature, when she destroyed the last exemplars on which she formed those beasts, surely did well to take such executioners from Mars. And if she has not repented the creation of whales and elephants, the thinking man will see in that her justice and discretion: for where the instrument of intelligence is added to brute power and evil will, mankind is powerless in its own defense” (46-57).

Dante to the reader describes the giants, “His face, it seemed to me, was quite as high and wide as the bronze pine cone in St. Peter’s with the rest of him proportioned accordingly: so that the bank, which made an apron for him from the waist down, still left so much exposed that three Frieslanders standing on the rim, one on another, could not have reached his hair; for to that point at which men’s capes are buckled, thirty good hand-spans of brute bulk rose clear” (58-66).

“The bronze pine cone in St. Peter’s” was originally part of a fountain (59). During Dante’s time, the bronze pine cone stood in front of the Basilica of St. Peter. However, the bronze pine cone is now inside the Vatican. The bronze pine cone is nearly thirteen feet high, but shows signs of mutilation. Therefore, at one time the bronze pine cone was taller. “Frieslanders” are men of Friesland, and were considered the tallest in Europe (63). “Thirty good hand-spans” refers to the spread of an open hand (66). According to the Dante Society edition of the “Comedy,” it equates ten palms to be four meters or 158 inches. However, 15.8 inches seems to be an excessive hand span.

The Brute bellowed chant, “Rafel mahee amek zabi almit” (67). Virgil to the Brute screamed in his direction: “Babbling fool, stick to your horn and vent yourself with it when rage or passion stir your stupid soul. Feel there around your neck, you muddle-head, and find the cords; and there’s the horn itself, there on your overgrown chest” (70-75). Virgil to Dante regarding the Brute says, “His very babbling testifies the wrong he did on earth: he is Nimrod, through whose evil mankind no longer speaks a common tongue. Waste no words on him: it would be foolish. To him all speech is meaningless; as his own, which no one understands, is simply gibberish” (76-81).

“Nimrod” was the first king of Babylon (77). Nimrod was supposed to have built the Tower of Babel. Nimrod was punished by the confusion of his own tongue and lack of understanding. The Tower of Babel was not built for worship and praise of Yahweh, but instead was dedicated to the glory of man to make a name for the builder, Nimrod. This displeased Yahweh. Yahweh is the personal name for God in the Hebrew Bible.

Virgil and Dante moved on, “Bearing left along the pit, and a crossbow-sho0t away we found the next one, an even huger and more savage spirit” (82-84). Dante to the reader contemplates and describes, “What master could have bound so gross a beast I cannot say, but he had his right arm pinned behind his back, and the left across his breast by an enormous chain that wound about him from the neck down, completing five great turns before it spiraled down below the rim” (85-90).

Virgil to Dante says, “This piece of arrogance dared try his strength against the power of Jove; for which he is rewarded as you see. He is Ephialtes, who made the great endeavour with the other giants who alarmed the Gods; the arms he raised then, now are bound forever” (91-96). Please note: “Ephialtes” is the son of Neptune and Iphimedia (94). With his brother, Otus, Ephialtes warred against the Gods striving to pile Mt. Ossa on Mt. Olympus, and Mt. Pelion on Mt. Ossa. Apollo restored order by killing the two brothers, Ephialtes and Otus.

Dante to Virgil replies, “Were it possible, I should like to take with me the memory of seeing the immeasurable Briareus” (97-99). Please note: “Briareus” is another giant who rose against the Olympian Gods (99). Briareus is the son of Uranus and Tellus. In the “Aeneid,” Virgil speaks of Briareus as having a hundred arms and fifty hands.

Virgil to Dante explains, “Nearer to hand, you may observe Antaeus who is able to speak to us, and is not bound. It is he will set us down in Cocytus, the bottom of all guilt. The other hulk stands far beyond our road. He too, is bound and looks like this one, but with a fiercer sulk” (100-105).

“Antaeus” is the son of Neptune and Tellus (100). In battle, Antaeus strength grew each time he touched the earth. Antaeus was invincible until Hercules killed him by lifting him over his head and strangling him in mid-air. In “Pharsalia” by Lucan, Antaeus great lion-hunting feat in the valley of Zama is described. During a later era, in the valley of Zama, that is where Scipio defeated Hannibal. Antaeus did not join in the rebellion against the gods, and therefore, Antaeus is not chained.

Dante to the reader describes the environment, “No earthquake in the fury of its shock ever seized a tower more violently, than Ephialtes, hearing, began to rock. Then I dreaded death as never before; and I think I could have died for very fear had I not seen what manacles he wore. [Virgil and Dante] left the monster, and not far from him [they] reached Antaeus, who to his shoulders alone soared up a good five ells above the rim” (106-114).

Virgil to Antaeus request, “O soul who once in Zama’s fateful vale―where Scipio became the heir of glory when Hannibal and all his troops turned tail―took more than a thousand lions for your prey; and in whose memory many still believe the sons of earth would yet have won the day had you joined with them against High Olympus―do not disdain to do us a small service, but set us down where the cold grips Cocytus. Would you have us go to Tityos or Typon?―this man can give you what is longed for here: therefore do not refuse him, but bend down. For he can still make new your memory: he lives, and awaits long life, unless Grace call him before his time to his felicity” (115-129).

“Cocytus” is the final pit of Hell (123). “Tityos or Typhon” are the sons of Tellus (124). Tityos and Typhon offended Jupiter, who had them hurles into the crater of Etna. Below the crater of Etna, is where Lake Tartarus was supposed to lie.

Dante watches Antaeus without delay reach out the hands which Hercules felt, and raise Virgil. Virgil to Dante calls, “Come, and I will hold you safe” (134). Virgil took Dante in his arms and held him. Dante makes a metaphor to describe the situation, “The way the Carisenda seems to one who looks up from the learning side when clouds are going over it from that direction, making the whole tower seem to topple―so Antaeus seemed to me in the fraught moment when I stood clinging, watching them below as he bent down; while I with heart and soul wished we had gone some other way, but gently he set us down inside the final hole whose ice holds Judas and Lucifer in its grip. Then straightened like a mast above a ship” (136-146). Please note: In order to understand this metaphor, the reader needs to know that “Carisenda” is a leaning tower of Bologna (136).

Canto XXXI: English Translation:
(1) One and the same tongue had first wounded me
(2) So that the blood came rushing to my cheeks,
(3) And then supplied the soothing remedy.

(4) Just so, as I have heard, the magic steel
(5) Of the lance that was Achilles’ and his father’s
(6) Could wound at a touch, and, at another, heal.

(7) We turned our backs on the valley and climbed from it
(8) To the top of the stony bank that walls it round,
(9) Crossing in silence to the central pit.

(10) Here it was less than night and less than day;
(11) My eyes could make out little through the gloom,
(12) But I heard the shrill note of a trumpet bray

(13) Louder than any thunder. As if by force,
(14) It drew my eyes; I stared into the gloom
(15) Along the path of the sound back to its source.

(16) After the bloody rout when Charlemagne
(17) Had lost the band of Holy Knights, Roland
(18) Blew no more terribly for all his pain.

(19) And as I stared through that obscurity,
(20) I saw what seemed a cluster of great towers,
(21) Whereat I cried: “Master, what is this city?”

(22) And he: “You are still too far back in the dark
(23) To make out clearly what you think you see;
(24) It is natural that you should miss the mark:

(25) You will see clearly when you reach that place
(26) How much your eyes mislead you at a distance;
(27) I urge you, therefore, to increase your pace.”

(28) Then taking my hand in his, my Master said:
(29) “The better to prepare you for strange truth,
(30) Let me explain those shapes you see ahead:

(31) They are not towers but giants. They stand in the well
(32) From the navel down; and stationed round its bank
(33) They mount guard on the final pit of Hell.”

(34) Just as a man in a fog that starts to clear
(35) Begins little by little to piece together
(36) The shapes the vapor crowded from the air―

(37) So, when those shapes grew clearer as I drew
(38) Across the darkness to the central brink,
(39) Error fled from me; and my terror grew.

(40) For just as at Montereggione the great towers
(41) Crown the encircling wall; so the grim giants
(42) Whom Jove still threatens when the thunder roars

(43) Raised form the rim of stone about that well
(44) The upper halves of their bodies, which loomed up
(45) Like turrets through the murky air of Hell.

(46) I had drawn close enough to one already
(47) To make out the great arms along his sides,
(48) The face, the shoulders, the breast, and most of the belly.

(49) Nature, when she destroyed the last exemplars
(50) On which she formed those beasts, surely did well
(51) To take such executioners from Mars.

(52) And if she has not repented the creation
(53) Of whales and elephants, the thinking man
(54) Will see in that her justice and discretion:

(55) For where the instrument of intelligence
(56) Is added to brute power and evil will,
(57) Mankind is powerless in its own defense.

(58) His face, it seemed to me, was quite as high
(59) And wide as the bronze pine cone in St. Peter’s
(60) With the rest of him proportioned accordingly:

(61) So that the bank, which made an apron for him
(62) From waist down, still left so much exposed
(63) That three Frieslanders standing on the rim,

(64) One on another, could not have reached his hair;
(65) For to that point at which men’s capes are buckled,
(66) Thirty good hand-spans of brute bulk rose clear.

(67) “Rafel mahee amek zabi almit,”
(68) Began a bellowed chant from the brute mouth
(69) For which no sweeter psalmody was fit.

(70) And my Guide in his direction: “Babbling fool,
(71) Stick to your horn and vent yourself with it
(72) When rage or passion stir your stupid soul.

(73) Feel there around your neck, you muddle-head,
(74) And find the cord; and there’s the horn itself,
(75) There on your overgrown chest.” To me he said:

(76) “His very babbling testifies the wrong
(77) He did non earth: he is Nimrod, through whose evil
(78) Mankind no longer speaks a common tongue.

(79) Waste no words on him: it would be foolish.
(80) To him all speech is meaningless; as his own,
(81) Which no one understands, is simple gibberish.”

(82) We moved on, bearing left along the pit,
(83) And a crossbow-shot away we found the next one,
(84) An even huger and more savage spirit.

(85) What master could have bound so gross a beast
(86) I cannot say, but he had his right arm pinned
(87) Behind his back, and the left across his breast

(88) By an enormous chain that wound about him
(89) From the neck down, completing five great turns
(90) Before it spiraled down below the rim.

(91) “This piece of arrogance,” said my Guide to me,
(92) “dated try his strength against the power of Jove;
(93) For which he is rewarded as you see.

(94) He is Ephialtes, who made the great endeavour
(95) With the other giants who alarmed the Gods;
(96) The arms he raised then, now are bound forever.”

(97) “Were it possible, I should like to take with me,”
(98) I said to him, “the memory of seeing
(99) The immeasurable Briareus.” And he:

(100) “Nearer to hand, you may observe Antaeus
(101) Who is able to speak to us, and is not bound.
(102) It is he will set us down in Cocytus,

(103) The bottom of all guilt. The other hulk
(104) Stands far beyond our road. He too, is bound
(105) And looks like this one, but with a fiercer sulk.”

(106) No earthquake in the fury of its shock
(107) Ever seized a tower more violently,
(108) Than Ephialtes, hearing, began to rock.

(109) Then I dreaded death as never before;
(110) And I think I could have died for very fear
(111) Had I not seen what manacles he wore.

(112) We left the monster, and not far from him
(113) We reached ANtaeus, who to his shoulders alone
(114) Soared up a good five ells above the rim.

(115) “O soul who once in Zama’s fateful vale―
(116) Where Scipio became the heir of glory
(117) When Hannibal and all his troops turned tail―

(118) Took more than a thousand lions for your prey;
(119) And in whose memory many still believe
(120) The sons of earth would yet have won the day

(121) Had you joined with them against High Olympus―
(122) Do not disdain to do us a small service,
(123) But set us down where the cold grips Cocytus.

(124) Would you have us go to Tityos or Typhon?―
(125) This man can give you what is longed for here:
(126) Therefore do not refuse him, but bend down.

(127) For he can still make new your memory:
(128) He lives, and awaits long life, unless Grace call him
(129) Before his time to his felicity.”

(130) Thus my Master to that Tower of Pride;
(131) And the giant without delay reached out the hands
(132) Which Hercules had felt, and raised my Guide.

(133) Virgil, when he felt himself so grasped,
(134) Called to me: “Come, and I will hold you safe.”
(135) And he took me in his arms and held me clasped.

(136) The way the Carisenda seems to one
(137) Who looks up from the learning side when clouds
(138) Are going over it from that direction,

(139) Making the whole tower seem to topple―so
(140) Antaeus seemed to me in the fraught moment
(141) When I stood clinging, watching from below

(142) As he bent down; while I with heart and soul
(143) Wished we had gone some other way, but gently
(144) He set us down inside the final hole

(145) Whose ice holds Judas and Lucifer in its grip.
(146) Then straightened like a mast above a ship.

Canto XXXI: Italian Manuscript:

(1) Una medesma lingua pria mi morse,
(2) sì che mi tinse l’una e l’altra guancia,
(3) e poi la medicina mi riporse;

(4) così od’ io che solea far la lancia
(5) d’Achille e del suo padre esser cagione
(6) prima di trista e poi di buona mancia.

(7) Noi demmo il dosso al misero vallone
(8) su per la ripa che ’l cinge dintorno,
(9) attraversando sanza alcun sermone.

(10) Quiv’ era men che notte e men che giorno,
(11) sì che ’l viso m’andava innanzi poco;
(12) ma io senti’ sonare un alto corno,

(13) tanto ch’avrebbe ogne tuon fatto fioco,
(14) che, contra sé la sua via seguitando,
(15) dirizzò li occhi miei tutti ad un loco.

(16) Dopo la dolorosa rotta, quando
(17) Carlo Magno perdé la santa gesta,
(18) non sonò sì terribilmente Orlando.

(19) Poco portäi in là volta la testa,
(20) che me parve veder molte alte torri;
(21) ond’ io: «Maestro, dì, che terra è questa?».

(22) Ed elli a me: «Però che tu trascorri
(23) per le tenebre troppo da la lungi,
(24) avvien che poi nel maginare abborri.

(25) Tu vedrai ben, se tu là ti congiungi,
(26) quanto ’l senso s’inganna di lontano;
(27) però alquanto più te stesso pungi».

(28) Poi caramente mi prese per mano
(29) e disse: «Pria che noi siam più avanti,
(30) acciò che ’l fatto men ti paia strano,

(31) sappi che non son torri, ma giganti,
(32) e son nel pozzo intorno da la ripa
(33) da l’umbilico in giuso tutti quanti».

(34) Come quando la nebbia si dissipa,
(35) lo sguardo a poco a poco raffigura
(36) ciò che cela ’l vapor che l’aere stipa,

(37) così forando l’aura grossa e scura,
(38) più e più appressando ver’ la sponda,
(39) fuggiemi errore e cresciemi paura;

(40) però che, come su la cerchia tonda
(41) Montereggion di torri si corona,
(42) così la proda che ’l pozzo circonda

(43) torreggiavan di mezza la persona
(44) li orribili giganti, cui minaccia
(45) Giove del cielo ancora quando tuona.

(46) E io scorgeva già d’alcun la faccia,
(47) le spalle e ’l petto e del ventre gran parte,
(48) e per le coste giù ambo le braccia.

(49) Natura certo, quando lasciò l’arte
(50) di sì fatti animali, assai fé bene
(51) per tòrre tali essecutori a Marte.

(52) E s’ella d’elefanti e di baleen
(53) non si pente, chi guarda sottilmente,
(54) più giusta e più discreta la ne tene;

(55) ché dove l’argomento de la mente
(56) s’aggiugne al mal volere e a la possa,
(57) nessun riparo vi può far la gente.

(58) La faccia sua mi parea lunga e grossa
(59) come la pina di San Pietro a Roma,
(60) e a sua proporzione eran l’altre ossa;

(61) sì che la ripa, ch’era perizoma
(62) dal mezzo in giù, ne mostrava ben tanto
(63) di sovra, che di giugnere a la chioma

(64) tre Frison s’averien dato mal vanto;
(65) però ch’i’ ne vedea trenta gran palmi
(66) dal loco in giù dov’ omo affibbia ’l manto.

(67) «Raphèl maì amècche zabì almi»,
(68) cominciò a gridar la fiera bocca,
(69) cui non si convenia più dolci salmi.

(70) E ’l duca mio ver’ lui: «Anima sciocca,
(71) tienti col corno, e con quel ti disfoga
(72) quand’ ira o altra passïon ti tocca!

(73) Cércati al collo, e troverai la soga
(74) che ’l tien legato, o anima confusa,
(75) e vedi lui che ’l gran petto ti doga».

(76) Poi disse a me: «Elli stessi s’accusa;
(77) questi è Nembrotto per lo cui mal coto
(78) pur un linguaggio nel mondo non s’usa.

(79) Lasciànlo stare e non parliamo a vòto;
(80) ché così è a lui ciascun linguaggio
(81) come ’l suo ad altrui, ch’a nullo è noto».

(82) Facemmo adunque più lungo vïaggio,
(83) vòlti a sinistra; e al trar d’un balestro
(84) trovammo l’altro assai più fero e maggio.

(85) A cigner lui qual che fosse ’l maestro,
(86) non so io dir, ma el tenea soccinto
(87) dinanzi l’altro e dietro il braccio destro

(88) d’una catena che ’l tenea avvinto
(89) dal collo in giù, sì che ’n su lo scoperto
(90) si ravvolgëa infino al giro quinto.

(91) «Questo superbo volle esser esparto
(92) di sua potenza contra ’l sommo Giove»,
(93) disse ’l mio duca, «ond’ elli ha cotal merto.

(94) Fïalte ha nome, e fece le gran prove
(95) quando i giganti fer paura a’ dèi;
(96) le braccia ch’el menò, già mai non move».

(97) E io a lui: «S’esser puote, io vorrei
(98) che de lo smisurato Brïareo
(99) esperïenza avesser li occhi mei».

(100) Ond’ ei rispuose: «Tu vedrai Anteo
(101) presso di qui che parla ed è disciolto,
(102) che ne porrà nel fondo d’ogne reo.

(103) Quel che tu vuo’ veder, più là è molto
(104) ed è legato e fatto come questo,
(105) salvo che più feroce par nel volto».

(106) Non fu tremoto già tanto rubesto,
(107) che scotesse una torre così forte,
(108) come Fïalte a scuotersi fu presto.

(109) Allor temett’ io più che mai la morte,
(110) e non v’era mestier più che la dotta,
(111) s’io non avessi viste le ritorte.

(112) Noi procedemmo più avante allotta,
(113) e venimmo ad Anteo, che ben cinque alle,
(114) sanza la testa, uscia fuor de la grotta.

(115) «O tu che ne la fortunata valle
(116) che fece Scipïon di gloria reda,
(117) quand’ Anibàl co’ suoi diede le spalle,

(118) recasti già mille leon per preda,
(119) e che, se fossi stato a l’alta Guerra
(120) de’ tuoi fratelli, ancor par che si creda

(121) ch’avrebber vinto i figli de la terra:
(122) mettine giù, e non ten vegna schifo,
(123) dove Cocito la freddura serra.

(124) Non ci fare ire a Tizio né a Tifo:
(125) questi può dar di quel che qui si brama;
(126) però ti china e non torcer lo grifo.

(127) Ancor ti può nel mondo render fama,
(128) ch’el vive, e lunga vita ancor aspetta
(129) se ’nnanzi tempo grazia a sé nol chiama».

(130) Così disse ’l maestro; e quelli in fretta
(131) le man distese, e prese ’l duca mio,
(132) ond’ Ercule sentì già grande stretta.

(133) Virgilio, quando prender si sentio,
(134) disse a me: «Fatti qua, sì ch’io ti prenda»;
(135) poi fece sì ch’un fascio era elli e io.

(136) Qual pare a riguardar la Carisenda
(137) sotto ’l chinato, quando un nuvol vada
(138) sovr’ essa sì, ched ella incontro penda:

(139) tal parve Antëo a me che stava a bada
(140) di vederlo chinare, e fu tal ora
(141) ch’i’ avrei voluto ir per altra strada.

(142) Ma lievemente al fondo che divora
(143) Lucifero con Giuda, ci sposò;
(144) né, sì chinato, lì fece dimora,

(145) e come albero in nave si levò.


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